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TCC : Our College : Our Leadership : President's Blog

President's Blog 

Happy Holidays 2014

Jim Murdaugh, President Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Every year, I look forward to observing Christmas as part of my personal faith. I also take the time to try to learn something new about the many different nationalities and beliefs represented in our College and throughout our community. With students, faculty and staff from over 80 countries, I think it is important to take a moment and recognize the great diversity of holidays that are also celebrated in December from Hanukkah to Kwanzaa.
 
There’s so much good cheer going around this time of year. Let’s keep that going by embracing this season not just for each individual holiday, but as a larger celebration of diversity and acceptance.
 
I want to wish our TCC family and friends a joyous holiday season. If you are traveling, be safe on the roads. Otherwise, I hope you share your time with those you care about, laugh a lot, and remember that the best things in life are not things.

Jim


Let's Make Thanksgiving a Habit

Jim Murdaugh, President Monday, November 24, 2014

​Every morning, before the rest of my household is awake, I pour myself a cup of coffee, sit down (lately in front of the fire) and practice what I like to call daily gratitude. This is the time I take to reflect on the things I am thankful for that day. Some items on this list repeat, but others I am reminded of from the previous day’s events, maybe during a staff meeting or at a reception or even just by a chance encounter with an old friend.

Thanksgiving is not just a celebration reserved for once a year, it is a verb and it should happen every day.

This exercise has changed the way I approach all the relationships in my life for the better. I find that the more appreciation I practice, the easier it is to empathize and understand others.

Thanksgiving is not just a celebration reserved for once a year, it is a verb and it should happen every day. Repeated actions become habits and our habits are what make us who we are. As we approach the holidays, I want to invite all our campus family to practice daily gratitude. I believe it was Plato that once wrote, “Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a harder battle.” This couldn’t be truer of our campus family. The longer I am in this position, the more I get to hear others’ stories and the more I realize we all need to pause and appreciate those who we work with because many are fighting harder battles.

With that said, I want to express my gratitude to all those who make our campus a great place to learn and work. Thank you for all you do and have a happy Thanksgiving!

Jim


A View Ahead

Jim Murdaugh, President Monday, October 6, 2014

Last week I traveled to Orlando where I took part in the Future of Florida forum and was a part of a panel discussing the state of higher education and how to assess and meet the needs of Florida workforce moving forward. Later in the week I attended another forum back in town on the Future of Higher Education in Florida in which participants discussed attainment, accountability and challenging status quo ideas of post-secondary learning.

These are the conversations I love to have – outlook, opportunity and how we can position ourselves to leapfrog ahead and meet the students where they will be instead of where they are now.

As many of you are now aware, Tallahassee Community College is in the process of implementing a new Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system. What many of you may not know is that it took us years to find the right system, not only because of the massive scope of such a project, but because it seemed as though most of the systems we looked at represented incremental progress. When we selected our new system, it was because it was an innovative, cloud-based system that would provide solutions to problems students, faculty and staff have today as well as those they would have years from now. That’s leapfrogging ahead.

T​he state of higher education

There is a shift happening in higher ed. A few short years ago, degrees were considered a proxy for job-applicable skillsets. You went to college, earned your degree, interviewed for jobs, and then were hired, all on the assumption that if you had a degree you had everything you needed to perform the duties assigned. Today, employers are in need of more well-rounded professionals and are telling us graduates are in serious need of more soft skills like networking, email etiquette or how to conduct a productive team meeting, things that are often neglected in non-business degree tracks.

There is also disruption in evaluation and instructional formats. Traditionally, teaching is assessed in brick and mortar classrooms where time is considered a constant (one semester) and learning a variable (grades A down to F). That model is now being challenged. Learning needs to be assessed more than teaching, in spaces when and where the students are. And time, not learning, needs to be seen as the variable. 

There is much more to come. Our College is poised for some big changes ahead and this is just the beginning of what I see as a tremendous future.​

Our focus will move towards measuring learning outcomes. We need to provide a variety of teaching modes to fit the content, the student’s capability and our rapidly diversifying labor market. 

To be fair, these changes have been a long time coming. When I got my first promotion into a management position, I started in my new role the following day but was told the next training workshop wouldn’t be for another six months. Unfortunately, by the time that workshop rolled around, it was too late to be helpful and worse yet, it was a waste of time. What I needed was “just enough, just in time” training. 

Students should be able to brush up on skills or add new ones. They should be able to work on customizable micro-credentials while earning their degree. And they should be able to start anytime, learn anytime, finish anytime.

To add another layer to all this, we need to also consider the changing landscape of technology. New platforms and products crop up every day. Most fade, but some go on to become indispensable to everyday life. Think the POP3 server, Facebook and blogs (like this one!)

At our College, I feel it is essential to choose technology solutions that move us to the head of the industry and not restrict us to the minimum of innovation. This was why I couldn’t be more excited for our landmark partnership with Workday or this year’s Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) focus on digital literacy

Moving forward

These are just two of the projects our College has embarked on to transform the way we align with the new face of education and the tools of tomorrow. There is much more to come. Our College is poised for some big changes ahead and this is just the beginning of what I see as a tremendous future.

My job is to identify the changes and help guide us to that future. With my next few blogs, I will be writing on the role I see each of us as stakeholders of TCC playing in the coming years and how we will all coordinate to embrace the new era of higher education. These groups include, but are not limited to, students, faculty, staff, trustees, board members, community leaders and our education partners. My hope is that through these and other discussions, we can better understand where we are headed and continue our dialogue of how we will get there. Stay tuned.

Jim ​​​


Announcing the Institute for Nonprofit Innovation and Excellence

Jim Murdaugh, President Tuesday, June 24, 2014

INIE-1_6-24-14.jpgToday, Tallahassee Community College launched a brand new initiative for nonprofits in our community. Many of you may have already heard about this project from all the interest it has generated in the past few weeks. In truth this has been something I’ve been planning for years.

I have a passion for nonprofits. They are a vastly underappreciated and underrepresented component of local economic growth and I believe you cannot have a vibrant economy without them. Several years ago a study was done on Leon County nonprofits. According to data recorded from 2004 operating revenues, the 251 total organizations in existence at the time had created 4,216 jobs generating $144.4 million in total gross wages annually, and a gross annual output of nearly $300 million. In 2007, a survey indicated that “annually 82% of all Leon County nonprofit operating revenues are expended within Leon County.”*

Today, our region is home to over 600 501(c)(3) Charitable Not for Profit Organizations. If their collective revenues have increased relative to their rate of growth, you can imagine what their fiscal contribution to our local economy is now.

And yet, the nonprofit sector is still in many ways “an invisible part of the local economy.”* My goal is to change that. It’s why I am a member of a number of nonprofit boards and why I insisted on adding a fee-free nonprofit seat on the Economic Development Council when I became chair last year. It’s why I am president of TCC, an institution that was founded on the same principles that guide nonprofits – education and public service. And it’s why I spearheaded an initiative at the College that will help our area’s nonprofits. 

INIE-2_6-24-14.jpgWhat I dreamed up, Kimberly Moore, vice president for Workforce Development, and her team has made happen. My idea of a training center with robust resources and services to “advocate, educate and engage” our nonprofits was just that, a dream. But together with some key partners, we have made it a reality.

It is with great pleasure that we announced the launch of the new Institute for Nonprofit Innovation and Excellence, or INIE for short, downtown at the TCC Capitol Center today. We hosted a number of guest speakers and also released the full list of our programs for the next year which will include workshops and networking events. For all the details, please visit www.theinstitutefornonprofits.org.

Nonprofits have always provided unparalleled social and economic value. I am looking forward to seeing the impact INIE will have in helping these great organizations and our community grow.

Jim

* Economic Assessment of the Leon County 501(c)(3) Charitable Not for Profit Organizations and Impact Contributions to the Tallahassee and Leon County Economy [Study by United Partners for Human Services in partnership with the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation]

 

Celebrating the Future: Congratulations, Class of 2014

Jim Murdaugh, President Thursday, April 24, 2014

We’ve reached one of my favorite times of the year. Spring is in the air, the semester is winding down and another great academic year is wrapping up. But most importantly, next weekend, we will get to gather together to celebrate the successes of our wonderful graduates, the class of 2014. 

Graduation is bittersweet, of course, as we are also saying goodbye. I always hope that the students we send off will not become strangers. There are many benefits to staying in our community and giving back. Whether it is continuing an education at any of the world-class universities in town, or securing a public or private sector job and putting down roots, Tallahassee offers lots of opportunities. 

And TCC has given our graduates the skills and credentials to take advantage of any of these opportunities. We pride ourselves in teaching not just academics, but citizenship and service as well. Our students become nurses, police officers, water quality technicians, and software developers. Their education makes them competitive in their chosen markets and highly employable. For every dollar students invest in themselves at TCC, their future income is increased by about $6.50, or an average of 17% return on investment. Likewise, for every dollar of state tax money invested in TCC, $3.60 is returned to the taxpayers and overall, our College boosts the local economies in our service area by $387.7 million annually. 

However, though our impact can be seen on a large scale, it is only achieved through individualized experiences. Our students are not just another number here. We are so very proud of each and every one of them. Students like Candace Tibbetts, who was recently named to the All-Florida Academic Team, or Anthony Johnson, this year’s commencement speaker, or the TCC Model United Nations group or the TCC Softball team or Theatre TCC!, whom have all represented our College with distinction this year. But also the students who come to class every day and do the work that will benefit themselves and their families. We recognize the drive in each of them and are continuously inspired by their determination. Our doors will always be open to them, even after graduation, and we hope they will feel welcome to come back and say hello, attend a community event, maybe even take another class or two. 

Finally, to the TCC class of 2014 I want to say, graduation is not the last stop on the road, it’s the first stop. That’s why it is called “commencement.” My advice is to recognize that the future will bring challenges as well as rewards so prepare accordingly. Continuing your education, informally or formally, will help you along your journey no matter where your ambitions take you. 

Congratulations, graduates, and best wishes! 

Jim​​


Celebrating Black History Month at TCC

Jim Murdaugh, President Tuesday, January 28, 2014

On Monday, TCC unveiled our 14th annual Cherry Alexander African-American History Calendar in a special event that both showcased the calendar’s 14 honorees and kicked off our celebration of Black History Month. This year’s theme for the calendar was, “Civil Rights Unsung Heroes: Great by Choice” and each of the individuals featured in the calendar were chosen for their significant contributions to the community.   

During the ceremony, I found myself reflecting on the “great by choice” theme. The calendar’s honorees were all pioneering leaders who at any point in their careers could have chosen an easier path. Fortunately for all of us, they chose to be the first to break through their respective barriers, improving the path for all those who would follow and promoting our country’s founding principles of equality and opportunity.    

Diversity, particularly as a minority serving institution, among our student population as well as among our faculty and staff, is a great source of pride for our College.​

I also appreciate the theme because TCC is known as the “college of choice,” a tagline which I feel has many different meanings. For example, we are the college of choice for over 4,700 African American students. (For perspective: that is just over half as many students as Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University enrolled in Fall 2012.) In 2013, we were ranked fifth in the nation among two-year colleges in awarding associate degrees to African American students having graduated over 700 African American students. 

We are also the employer of choice for many outstanding African American faculty and staff like recently retired math professor Mac McCorvey who, until his retirement, was the most senior faculty member at the college, and Kimberly Moore, vice president for workforce development who was appointed to the FAMU Board of Trustees last year and selected by the Florida Diversity Council to receive their 2014 Florida Most Powerful and Influential Woman Award. 

Diversity, particularly as a minority serving institution, among our student population as well as among our faculty and staff, is a great source of pride for our College. The cultural richness that comes as a result is not only a fortunate side-effect of our open-education policy, it has become an essential component of our collective success. Every day thousands of students, faculty and staff come together on this campus. They bring their own individual experiences, insights, and talents, and together they create something cool, something new, something better.  We are, and always will be, greater than the sum of our parts and that is the story of our College.

Jim​


Happy Holidays 2013

Jim Murdaugh, President Friday, December 6, 2013

This semester has flown by, as has this entire year. Already we are putting up the decorations, gathering family and friends, and celebrating the holidays again.

I blinked, and 2013 is over. Or at least that’s how it feels.

In reality we have had another great year at Tallahassee Community College. There have been a few challenges but many more accomplishments. In case you missed some of our College’s biggest news stories, here are just a few highlights.

  • ao97xx24mkt7mzx1.jpgOur student organizations continue to thrive and bring home awards such as the Model United Nations team that earned the highest award at an international conference earlier this year
  • Our nursing program received national accreditation from the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission, Inc.
  • TCC rose to No. 1 in the National Junior College Athletic Association Division 1 Baseball Poll for the first time in the program’s 23-year history. 
  • The new Wakulla Environmental Institute broke ground in April
  • We were recertified as a Leader College by Achieving the Dream, a national reform network dedicated to community college student success and completion. 
  • TCC was ranked No. 1 in the nation among two-year institutions in graduating students with A.A. degrees. 
  • TCC’s Police Department became the first among Florida state colleges to receive accreditation from the Commission for Florida Law Enforcement Accreditation. 
  • IMG_0546webedit.jpgWe entered into a partnership with Workday, Inc. to build Workday Student, the first student service application developed for higher education in over two decades.
  • We finalized a new five-year Strategic Plan.
  • TCC was recognized as a military-friendly school by Victory Media’s 2014 Military Friendly Schools list  for our academic credibility, on-campus support, veteran student outcomes and student satisfaction.
  • Our District Board of Trustees approved the development of a proposal for a baccalaureate degree in nursing.
  • Our Connect2Complete and service learning programs were recognized for community engagement by Florida Campus Compact.

We certainly have a lot going on, none of which would be possible without the students, faculty and staff that make it happen. The individuals that comprise our TCC family all believe in the College’s principles of freedom and equality through open access to education, and being a 'College of Choice'. They come here from all over to learn, to grow and to give back. Needless to say, it is an inspiring place to work.

This season, I invite you to reflect on all that we have to be thankful for. Myself, I am thankful for a fulfilling job and the many great family and friends who remind me every day what is important in a life well lived.

Happy Holidays!

Jim

 

Moving Forward with an RN-to-Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program

Jim Murdaugh, President Tuesday, October 22, 2013

It was January 21, 1964 when an official request was made to conduct a survey to determine if there was a need for a two-year junior college in the Leon, Wakulla and Gadsden county area. Two years later, Tallahassee Community College, then known as Tallahassee Junior College, opened its doors.

TCC District Board of Trustees Meeting 10-21-13Yesterday’s Board of Trustees meeting marked another important milestone in our history – I brought to vote and the Board approved a measure to move forward with the development of a proposal for adding a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree for those who already have an Associate in Science in Nursing. I brought it forward because I believe the timing is compelling and the three objectives we set for ourselves at the beginning of this discussion have been met: 

It is good for our students. 

One of our College’s primary missions has always been to provide a high quality, affordable learning environment. I place great value in that. No degree we offer should be financially inaccessible. Our research shows our College can offer an RN to BSN program with no substantial increase in tuition. With facilities already in place at the Ghazvini Center, virtually no new resources would be needed and start-up costs can remain low. 

We also researched retention rates, licensure rates, optimal class times, degree path – all aspects of the student experience in a new nursing program have been vetted. Finally, we reached out to our current students, alumni and community to see if this is something they wanted. The response was an overwhelming, resounding ‘YES.’ 

It is good for our community. 

Tallahassee Memorial Healthcare President and CEO Mark O’Bryant spoke at the meeting yesterday on the value of our graduates at TMH, and how their education, qualifications and confidence in their practice make them preferred hires. However, in three years’ time their hospital’s Nurse Residency Program will require baccalaureate degrees. Regardless of how notable our current grads are, they would have been excluded. I am glad to say we will not be turning our backs on them. 

@GoToTCC Facebook Screenshot on Four-Year DiscussionIn addition to TMH, I was contacted by other local healthcare organizations such as Capital Regional Medical Center, Westminster Oaks and the upcoming VA hospital, and they have expressed similar sentiments. The need is there. They are ready for us to meet it. Of course, I also did not move forward until many discussions and planning meetings were conducted with our University Partners to ensure that our forward momentum would not interfere with their programs’ success. Our goal was always to create growth opportunities, not a competitive environment. 

It is good for our College. 

Relevancy is a priority for any higher education institution.  The writing is on the wall in the Florida College System with 24 of the 28 institutions having already begun adding four-year programs. A paradigm shift is happening. All the same, being at the front of the pack is less important to me than fiscal stewardship so we ran the numbers to make sure a new nursing program would be financially viable. Happily, our research shows that a baccalaureate degree in nursing would bring in significant revenue, a welcome concept in lean budget years. State legislature has also already committed a total of $30 million to expand baccalaureate degrees in Florida, funds we would not have been eligible for without the Board’s decision yesterday. 

Moving this initiative from idea to vote has assured me of just how much our Trustees love our College, something I was already well aware of. We’ve had many good conversations and I respect all sides greatly. 

Now that the decision has been made, the real work begins. At this point, it is premature to talk about changing the name. If our proposal is approved, then we will have to entertain that conversation. We’ve got a lot of t’s to cross and i’s to dot over the coming months and years. However, I fully anticipate this process will go smoother than most would think. Demand-driven initiatives tend to do that, in my experience. All are welcome to leave any comments or questions on my Facebook page at facebook.com/jimmurdaugh, or join us at our next Strategic Plan event on October 30 at 5:30 p.m. at the Florida Public Safety Institute in Gadsden County.

Jim​​​


Creating a Better College - Strategic Enrollment Management and the Strategic Plan

Thursday, September 26, 2013

IMG_8296.JPGGood things come to those who research thoroughly, plan accordingly and execute decisively.   

During the month of October, the College will be presenting our brand new five-year Strategic Plan to the community in three open forum events. The Plan outlines nine priorities, 35 strategies and has already prompted some very exciting discussions and commitments around here. But our work has only just begun.   

Enrollment is one of the Plan’s top priorities under which we will be developing and executing a Strategic Enrollment Management (SEM) plan to take effect during the 2014-15 academic year. To be clear, an SEM plan is more than just more students; SEM is a comprehensive process that encompasses everything from growing signature programs to recruiting top students to managing student success to helping alumni achieve their career goals. It is designed to guide a sustained and healthy increase in student and institutional success.   

In short, this new SEM plan will keep TCC moving forward.

What does all this mean for you? Among many other things:

For students, your student experience will receive a facelift – applying, orientation, enrollment, career planning, learning resources, co-curricular activities, and graduation, these and other student touch points will be streamlined and improved.     

For faculty, academic programs will be assessed for need and opportunity, advising and career counseling will be refined, and we will be developing or expanding strategies for early alert and intervention. We will also plan for better professional development and technology implementation. We want to make sure our instructors have the resources they need for our students to succeed.   

For staff, we will foster a culture of evaluation and feedback from all resource areas so each staff member has the tools to identify areas of improvement for everything from the application process to record keeping to campus communications.                     

For our community, this will mean TCC will continue to remain relevant and useful in today’s ever-changing education landscape.   

SEM is just part of our overall Strategic Plan. To hear more about our other priorities, please join us one of the three Strategic Plan events:         

  • Wakulla County on October 1 at 5:30 p.m. at the Wakulla Center      
  • Leon County on October 21 at 5:30 p.m. in the Student Union Ballroom on TCC’s Main Campus
  • Gadsden County on October 30 at 5:30 p .m. at the Florida Public Safety Institution 

For more information about our Strategic Plan, SEM or any of the upcoming events, visit the Strategic Plan section of our Web site.   

Jim ​​​


Welcome Back - Fall 2013

Jim Murdaugh, President Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Welcome to fall semester 2013 at Tallahassee Community College!IMG_9859edit.jpg

Now that another summer has come to a close and fall semester 2013 has begun, I find myself once again reflecting on the months and years past. Though it feels like the blink of an eye, this November will mark my third year as president of Tallahassee Community College. We’ve had a lot of changes during those three years, the most recent of which I discuss in my Summer Mash-Up video below. 

But one thing that hasn’t changed is my respect for our students, faculty and staff, the three pillars of our campus family. Their enthusiasm for what we do reminds me every day of what makes our College such a great success – the talent of our faculty, the dedication of our staff and the determination of our students. I’m excited to see what this new year will bring. 

A few housekeeping notes. The College’s new Strategic Plan is available on our Web site here. The Plan describes our vision, our mission and how we hope to implement strategic priorities over the coming year and beyond. Also, students should become familiar with our Code of Conduct which can be found here. It outlines standards of conduct, procedures and student rights which are all designed to ensure our campus remains “a place of learning, safety, shared responsibility and harmony.” 

Finally, I highly recommend that everyone gets involved on campus as much as possible this year whether it is through volunteer opportunities afforded by the Office of Service Learning and Civic Engagement, or with a student organization. College is such a great experience and getting involved only enriches that experience while also benefiting our campus and our community. 

As we kick-off another academic year, I hope everyone will remember to hold each other in as high regard as I do. Work hard, study a lot, have fun and reach for the stars. Good luck! 

Jim​​

​​​​


My Take on This Week's Discussions

Jim Murdaugh, President Thursday, August 22, 2013

Monday’s Board of Trustees workshop saw a historic discussion take place – will TCC become a state college? It’s an excellent question, and one we wouldn’t be asking ourselves if a need hadn’t arisen from the community.    

First of all, it’s important to note that of the 28 schools in the Florida College System, 23 have already added four-year programs. This signals a distinct change in the system and we need to think of what this means for our College.   

Secondly, over recent months both of our Tallahassee area hospitals have come to me expressing a growing necessity for an RN to BSN program to keep up with growing industry demands.   

 

Asking the question does not force us in any direction, but not asking the question does.   ​

 

TCC has always had a commitment to our community. We respond quickly to the workforce needs of those we serve, and those we serve have in turn come to trust us to fulfill those needs. This simple model has seen our College grow from just a small junior college to the #1 A.A. producing two-year College in the nation with over 20,000 students and more than 90 academic and career programs.   

Three years ago, while interviewing for this position, I was asked about implementing baccalaureate degree programs in the future. I said then and I maintain today, it is helpful for any college to ask itself from time to time how well it is meeting the expectations of its students and its community. Asking the question does not force us in any direction, but not asking the question does.   

What we have to do at this point is talk, and listen. In order to move forward, we will need to determine if adding four-year degrees will be good for, 1) the community, 2) the students, and 3) the College. We will be having lots of conversations with our District Board of Trustees, our faculty and staff, our students, our partners, our employers, our alumni and the public at large. It’s going to take a while, but we want to invite all viewpoints and weigh all the pros and cons.   

I don’t believe in change for change’s sake. However, if we do find an unmet need we are well positioned to meet, we will need to have a willingness to go where the data takes us.     

Over the coming weeks and months, we will be opening up forums and hosting events to facilitate discussion on this big issue. In the meantime, I invite you to visit my Facebook page and leave your comments at www.facebook.com/jimmurdaugh  I look forward to hearing your feedback.   

Jim​


TCC Ranks First in A.A. Degrees Awarded

Jim Murdaugh, President Monday, July 22, 2013

This summer, as with every summer, has been a whirlwind. While many students take advantage of this semester by catching up on one or two classes, experiencing an internship or just relaxing, we administrators are spending every minute preparing the College for the upcoming academic year.1AA_6-26-13.jpg

In higher ed, summer is also when institutions are honored for previous years’ achievements. For example, TCC was recently ranked #1 nationally in the number of students graduating with A.A. degrees. That ranking in Community College Week reflects the fact that we awarded 3,006 A.A. degrees during 2011-12. We also ranked No. 5 for awarding associate degrees in all fields to African-American students.

I must say that moments like these leave me humbled. As president of TCC, I get to see first-hand how the enthusiasm of our instructors or advisors can inspire the creativity of a student who can then go on and change the world. Our alumni become nurses, CEO’s, artists, public servants and leaders among their peers, and we believe in each of them as soon as they step through our door. They have goals for their future, and we want to see them achieve those goals.     

As I wrote in a recent email to our faculty and staff, the numbers confirm that TCC students are reaching their goals – graduating and moving on to a university or directly into the workforce. This kind of success is not something that happens overnight; it is years in the making. These rankings are an affirmation of both the determination our students possess and the tremendous work our faculty and staff does to bring students to our College and give them the education and support they need to be successful. Thank you! Let’s keep up the good work.   

Jim


Getting Involved

Jim Murdaugh, President Tuesday, June 25, 2013

Tallahassee may be a little city, but it’s got big dreams. 

The melting pot that exists here between students and government, transients and natives, young and old produces a wonderfully diversified culture. From a leadership perspective, that can sometimes be a challenge, but more often than not, I’ve found that an assortment of perspectives leads to more creative ideas and better solutions. 

For that reason, I like to take collaborative approach to decision-making whenever possible. For example, the College’s recently finalized Strategic Plan was the result of months of surveys, town hall meetings and research, listening to faculty, staff, students, and the community in order to formulate priorities and strategies for the next five years.  TCC now has an excellent plan to move forward with focused goals that encompass all areas of our College. 

 I believe it is my privilege and duty to be involved in the community as much as humanly possible, and I also encourage our faculty, staff, and students to do the same.
The grassroots initiative Imagine Tallahassee, which I am excited to be a part of, has followed a similar path. Their mission is to provide citizens with a chance to brand Tallahassee by creating a long-term community vision. They have now hosted multiple forums and roundtables for the public, and plan to host more through partners around town. I believe the resulting strategy will be dynamic, exciting and more importantly, integral to the future of Tallahassee. The results of this effort will serve to help policy-makers identify projects that they can fund to grow the economy of our region.  

I’m also honored to have been selected as chair of the Economic Development Council of Tallahassee/Leon County (EDC), a post which I will assume this coming October. In line with Imagine Tallahassee, the EDC is committed to economic prosperity in our community.  They appreciate the different facets of Tallahassee’s identity and want to see its full potential realized through the combined effort of its citizens, private sector, education and local government. I’m definitely enthusiastic about the work both Imagine Tallahassee and the EDC are about to do in the next year or two. 

The reason I am telling you all this is to explain one of my principle motivations as president of TCC. I believe it is my privilege and duty to be involved in the community as much as humanly possible, and I also encourage our faculty, staff, and students to do the same. 

Our College has worked hard since 1966 to be a valuable resource to the community and every year, we continue to attract and support more students and business to this area. We place great value in those who utilize our institution to pull themselves up by their bootstraps, get their education and become successful and productive citizens. We think these individuals are Tallahassee’s most valuable resource. And after graduation, some are leaving the community to find jobs. 

This is why TCC wants to not only be the college of choice for our students, we also want to be the partner of choice in our community. We want to be a force for progress in Tallahassee and I believe that with the efforts of organizations like EDC and Imagine Tallahassee, a fantastic synergy can be achieved between the education and employment of top talent, and the progress of the entire community. We should welcome crowd-sourcing and citizen engagement. We need existing businesses to thrive, new businesses to choose to move here, and employment options that keep our graduates here.  

We need as much input and ownership from the public as we can get to achieve these goals. I invite all of you to get involved. This is our town, our home, and we have the opportunity to shape its development. Whether it is participating in an Imagine Tallahassee forum, a TCC student organization or a public service project, get involved. 

​​Jim


My Trip to Washington

Jim Murdaugh, President Friday, February 22, 2013

Capitol2_2-12-13small.jpgLast week, I traveled to Washington, DC with TCC Trustees Dana Callen, Allison DeFoor, Eugene Lamb and Karen Moore to participate in the National Legislative Summit hosted by the Association for Community College Trustees. The Summit offered us the rare opportunity to meet with trustees and presidents from community colleges around the country and be briefed on key federal issues impacting our colleges. We are grateful at TCC to have a board that is engaged in federal, state and local issues that affect our college and our ability to serve students.   

The week before our trip to Washington, many of our trustees also attended the Association of Florida Colleges legislative conference hosted here in Tallahassee. Both programs helped our trustees become more familiar with issues that could have a cascading impact on higher education in Florida and across the US.     

RepSoutherland2_2-13small.jpgWhile in Washington, we also took the opportunity to meet with our congressional members to share with them the importance of keeping our “open door” open to students with access to financial aid and academic resources. We also updated them on the College’s efforts to support economic and workforce development in our region.   

We extend our thanks and gratitude to Senators Bill Nelson and Marco Rubio and Representative Steve Southerland – and their respective staffs – for their interest in our College, for taking the time to meet with us while we were in Washington, and for their service to the citizens of Florida. They are very familiar with the issues impacting community colleges at the state and federal levels and I am confident that they are fighting for us every day. 

Jim​​


The Wakulla Environmental Institute

Jim Murdaugh, President Monday, January 14, 2013

WEIheader.jpg

​First of all, I want to thank Doug Blackburn and the Tallahassee Democrat for their article in last Sunday’s paper on the Wakulla Environmental Institute (WEI), as well as the follow-up editorial on January 9th. As Doug put it, we are “gung-ho” about the Institute and its potential, and we appreciate the shared enthusiasm. 

It is true that WEI is going to be a big deal. That’s an understatement, really. When it is finished, this multi-million dollar project will become a world-class destination for education, conservation and recreation. The initial facility, which we hope to break ground on this year, will be situated at the heart of the fifth hottest biodiversity spot in the nation on 158 acres and will feature landscapes so beautiful, it will make you want to come back again and again. (We’re counting on it.) It is also important to note that from this location, the Institute will have direct access to over one million acres of state and federal land and water.  

For more information on the Wakulla Environmental Institute, visit: www.tcc.fl.edu/WEI​​​

For students, WEI will mean innovative classes on the cutting-edge of environmental studies that result in focused degrees and in-demand job opportunities.  For county residents, it will mean 900 permanent and sustainable private-sector jobs in fishing, aqua culture, green business and more. For visitors, it will mean access to beautiful hiking trails, a private sink hole and a plethora of plant and animal life as part of a working research area. 

We believe Wakulla has a lot to offer. With the Institute, we look forward to showcasing the county’s best qualities. Of course, there is still a lot of planning to do and hurdles to overcome. I applaud the continued hard work of individuals like Trustee Allison DeFoor and Executive Director Bob Ballard as well as the amazing people who have agreed to serve on our new WEI Advisory Board who is helping to bring the project together. I especially appreciate Wakulla County leaders’ readiness to come together, roll up their sleeves and make this happen. A community in action like this is truly an awesome sight to behold. In the meantime, I hope everyone will please bear with us as we plan, build and realize this dream of ours. Stay tuned for more updates. 

Jim


Happy Holidays from TCC

Jim Murdaugh, President Tuesday, December 18, 2012

​As we prepare for the holiday season, it’s a great time to reflect on the year that’s coming to a close. We’re so grateful for the continued support of our friends, students and their families. We’re also thankful for the many contributions of our faculty and staff. Our national recognition this year as one of the best colleges to work for in America and one of the top associate’s degree producers in the country is the direct result of these contributions and the support we receive from so many.

We’re proud to be the college of choice for students in this community and look forward to serving our students in the year to come with outstanding programs and services that support their success while maintaining access and keeping our costs low. 

Happy Holidays to you and yours from Tallahassee Community College.

Jim

 

Check out President Murdaugh's holiday message on the latest episode of the TCC Report:

 

 


Celebrate Diversity

Jim Murdaugh, President Monday, December 10, 2012

IMG_6056-small.jpgAs many of you may already know thanks to our recent International Education Week, TCC is privileged to have 83 different countries represented by our student body. In light of that, I think it is important to take a moment and recognize the great diversity of holidays that are celebrated internationally in December. For example, here are just some of the holidays I know of and where they are observed.


  • December 8 - Bodhi Day (Buddhist)
  • December 8 – Hanukkah ​(Jewish)
  • December 21 - Winter Solstice (Northern Hemisphere)
  • December 21 – Pancha Ganapati (Hindu)
  • December 21 – Yule (Pagan, Germanic)
  • December 25 – Christmas Day (Christian)
  • December 26 – Boxing Day (British Commonwealth)
  • December 26 - Kwanzaa (US and Canada)
  • December 31 – New Year’s Eve (Worldwide)

 

So when we say ‘happy holidays’, its TCC’s small way of celebrating our amazing diversity and truly wishing a world of joy to all of our TCC family. ‘Happy holidays’ honors ‘Happy Hanukkah’, ‘Merry Yule’, ‘Merry Christmas’, ‘Happy Kwanzaa’, ‘Happy New Year’ and all the other festivities together. There so much good cheer going around this time of year. Let’s keep that going by embracing this season not just for the individual holidays but as a larger celebration of diversity and acceptance!​ ​


Jim


Giving Thanks

Jim Murdaugh, President Tuesday, November 20, 2012

​In the spirit of Thanksgiving this week, I just wanted to show my appreciation to all of our students, faculty, staff and alumni for making TCC the great college that it is. I’ve said it before and I will say it again. You represent some of the most dedicated and talented individuals I have ever known, and every day I get the privilege to work with you to create a better future for us all. I am so thankful to be representing you as president of the College.   

I am also thankful for my family - my beautiful wife, Sara, and my son, Austin, who is the coolest kid I know. They keep me grounded and make each day special.    

I want to encourage you to take a few minutes sometime in the next couple of days to reflect on those individuals in your own life who you care about. Through good times and bad, these are the folks who have helped you along your life’s journey.  Whether that is a committed instructor, a best friend, a caring employer or a loving parent, it is important to never take their kindness and support for granted.  

Otherwise, have a safe and happy break. Eat too much, relax as much as possible and we’ll see you back here on Monday ready to finish out the year strong.    

Jim ​


TCC Lives United

Jim Murdaugh, President Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Happy Halloween, everyone!​

IMAG0746-web.jpgI want to thank all the faculty and staff who participated in the Chili Cook-Off Monday as part of our annual United Way campaign. We had 15 entries, dozens of judges and together we were able to raise several hundred dollars towards the campaign pledge. Kudos! Though I appreciate being chosen the winner for my Brunswick Stew, I can personally testify that all the entries were delicious. Who knew we had such a talented group of chefs?  

I will also take this opportunity to encourage everyone to get involved in future campaign events. Every year, TCC does an amazing job of raising funds for United Way, an important organization that supports​ 40 individual human service organizations in our region. Last year we were able to raise $26,000.   

Our next planned event is this weekend at the Tallahassee Democrat Tip-Off Classic. All the proceeds from Saturday’s ticket sales will be donated to United Way. Check out the TCC Eagles Athletics News for more info. If you cannot participate in any of the upcoming events but would like to make a pledge, see your team leader for more details.   

All of your contributions to this worthy cause are much appreciated. I am proud that TCC LIVES UNITED.

Jim 

​​

Summer Mash-Up

Jim Murdaugh, President Friday, September 7, 2012

There was way too much going on this past summer to write about in one blog... or five for that matter. So instead of boring you with the details, I will present to you this video which gives just the highlights. ​ 

 

 

 

For more on what's been happening here at TCC these past few months, feel free to check out some of these links:

"TCC President proposes no tuition increase"

"TCC earns strong national marks from Community College Week"

Senate Committee Hearing on College Affordability

"TCC named a "2012 Great College to Work For"

"TCC receives $100,000 grant from the Walmart Foundation" 

Or visit our full news archives via the Office of Communications and Public Information​​​​​​

Jim


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A college is more than a collection of buildings or an online presence. A college is a community—a group of people with the same goal: to learn and to prepare for the future. And a great college is more than just a destination—it is a partner in the success of each student.

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